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Colin Clark

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Erlang, RabbitMQ, & Redis

Everyone’s busy abstracting resources in the cloud

VMWare has been on a buying spree lately.

In the last month, they’ve announced both Redis and RabbitMQ.

Here’s VMware’s take on Redis, and spring source’s on RabbitMQ.  RabbitMQ is built with Erlang.

Much Rejoicing in the Village

We use both of these technologies at Cloud Event Processing.  And we love Erlang too.  VMware’s acquisition of these technologies not only validates our decisions, which we are very selfishly pleased about, but also sends an interesting message.

The Message Please

Everyone’s busy abstracting resources in the cloud – making resources like compute, storage and network available dynamically, based upon demand.

But we need more services on top of that.  When an application is deployed, wouldn’t it be neat if things like messaging, protocol handling, persistence, queuing, etc. were readily available and abstracted for use?  We think so; that’s a core tenant of DarkStar – our cloud based, distributed event processing platform.  Which is also written predominantly in Erlang.  Maybe VMware has a plan here.

Erlang?  What is That?

Erlang was built from the ground up for concurrency.  Not just in a single machine, but in clusters of machines.  Lots of machines.

Lost of machines running many processes.  Sounds like a cloud, right?

For more information about the wonders of Erlang, I recommend Joe Armstrong’s book, “Programming Erlang” as a good starting point.  There’s also a wealth of information available via the web.  Erlang is used in many large systems and chances are you’ve used it and not even known – when’s the last time you chatted with someone on Facebook?  That’s written in Erlang.

Thanks for reading.

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More Stories By Colin Clark

Colin Clark is the CTO for Cloud Event Processing, Inc. and is widely regarded as a thought leader and pioneer in both Complex Event Processing and its application within Capital Markets.

Follow Colin on Twitter at http:\\twitter.com\EventCloudPro to learn more about cloud based event processing using map/reduce, complex event processing, and event driven pattern matching agents. You can also send topic suggestions or questions to colin@cloudeventprocessing.com